MEASLES INFORMATION

Take the initiative to protect yourself from the measles!

Measles is a highly contagious disease caused by exposure to the measles virus. It rapidly spreads through the air when an infected individual coughs or sneezes. The initial symptom of the measles is a fever; infected individuals will then experience a cough, runny nose, and red eyes. A tiny rash of red bumps will appear on the skin, first appearing on the head and working its way down the rest of the body.

Go to PHU2! for more information on how to protect yourself from measles and to review updates on the local impact in your community.

Para información en español, haga clic aquí.
Signs and Symptoms
The symptoms of measles generally appear about seven to 14 days after a person is infected.

Measles typically begins with

  • high fever,
  • cough,
  • runny nose (coryza), and
  • red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis).
  • Two or three days after symptoms begin, tiny white spots (Koplik spots) may appear inside the mouth.

    Three to five days after symptoms begin, a rash breaks out. It usually begins as flat red spots that appear on the face at the hairline and spread downward to the neck, trunk, arms, legs, and feet. Small raised bumps may also appear on top of the flat red spots. The spots may become joined together as they spread from the head to the rest of the body. When the rash appears, a person’s fever may spike to more than 104° Fahrenheit.

    After a few days, the fever subsides and the rash fades.

    Transmission of Measles
    Measles is a highly contagious virus that lives in the nose and throat mucus of an infected person.

    It can spread to others through coughing and sneezing. Also, measles virus can live for up to two hours in an airspace where the infected person coughed or sneezed. If other people breathe the contaminated air or touch the infected surface, then touch their eyes, noses, or mouths, they can become infected. Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, 90% of the people close to that person who are not immune will also become infected.

    Infected people can spread measles to others from four days before through four days after the rash appears.

    Measles is a disease of humans; measles virus is not spread by any other animal species.

    Frequently Asked Questions
    Q: I’ve been exposed to someone who has measles. What should I do?

    A: Immediately call your doctor and let him or her know that you have been exposed to someone who has measles. Your doctor can determine if you are immune to measles based on your vaccination record, age, or laboratory evidence, and make special arrangements to evaluate you, if needed, without putting other patients and medical office staff at risk. If you are not immune to measles, MMR vaccine or a medicine called immune globulin may help reduce your risk developing measles. Your doctor can help to advise you, and monitor you for signs and symptoms of measles.

    If you do not get MMR or immune globulin, you should stay away from settings where there are susceptible people (such as school, hospital, or childcare) until your doctor says it’s okay to return. This will help ensure that you do not spread it to others.

    Q: Am I protected against measles?

    A: CDC considers you protected from measles if you have written documentation (records) showing at least one of the following:

    You received two doses of measles-containing vaccine, and you are a(n)—
  • school-aged child (grades K-12)
  • adult who will be in a setting that poses a high risk for measles transmission, including students at post-high school education institutions, healthcare personnel, and international travelers.


  • You received one dose of measles-containing vaccine, and you are a(n)—
  • preschool-aged child
  • adult who will not be in a high-risk setting for measles transmission.
  • A laboratory confirmed that you had measles at some point in your life.
  • A laboratory confirmed that you are immune to measles.
  • You were born before 1957.


  • Q: What should I do if I’m unsure whether I’m immune to measles?

    A: If you’re unsure whether you’re immune to measles, you should first try to find your vaccination records or documentation of measles immunity. If you do not have written documentation of measles immunity, you should get vaccinated with measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Another option is to have a doctor test your blood to determine whether you’re immune. But this option is likely to cost more and will take two doctor’s visits. There is no harm in getting another dose of MMR vaccine if you may already be immune to measles (or mumps or rubella).

    Q: I think I have measles. What should I do?

    A: Immediately call your doctor and let him or her know about your symptoms you are having. Your doctor can determine if you are immune to measles based on your vaccination record or if you had measles in the past, and make special arrangements to evaluate you, if needed, without putting other patients and medical office staff at risk.

    Q: My doctor or someone from the health department told me that I have measles. What should I do?

    A: If you have measles, you should stay home for four days after you develop the rash. Staying home is an important way to not spread measles to other people. Talk to your doctor to discuss when it is safe to return.

    You should also
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and put your used tissue in the trash can. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve or elbow, not your hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Avoid sharing drinks or eating utensils.
  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys, doorknobs, tables, counters.
  • Call your doctor is you are concerned about your symptoms.


  • Q: How effective is the measles vaccine?

    A: The measles vaccine is very effective. One dose of measles vaccine is about 93% effective at preventing measles if exposed to the virus. Two doses are about 97% effective.

    Q: Could I still get measles if I am fully vaccinated?

    A: Very few people—about three out of 100—who get two doses of measles vaccine will still get measles if exposed to the virus. Experts aren’t sure why. It could be that their immune systems didn’t respond as well as they should have to the vaccine. But the good news is, fully vaccinated people who get measles are much more likely to have a milder illness. And fully vaccinated people are also less likely to spread the disease to other people, including people who can’t get vaccinated because they are too young or have weakened immune systems.

    Q: Do I ever need a booster vaccine?

    A: No. CDC considers people who received two doses of measles vaccine as children according to the U.S. vaccination schedule protected for life, and they do not ever need a booster dose.

    Adults need at least one dose of measles vaccine, unless they have evidence of immunity. Adults who are going to be in a setting that poses a high risk for measles transmission should make sure they have had two doses separated by at least 28 days. These adults include students at post-high school education institutions, healthcare personnel, and international travelers.

    If you’re not sure whether you were vaccinated, talk with your doctor. More information about who needs measles vaccine.

    Q: How common was measles in the United States before the vaccine?

    A: Before the measles vaccination program started in 1963, about 3 to 4 million people got measles each year in the United States. Of those people, 400 to 500 died, 48,000 were hospitalized, and 4,000 developed encephalitis (brain swelling) from measles.

    Q: What are the vaccine coverage levels like in the United States?

    A: Nationally, the rates of people vaccinated against measles have been very stable since the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program began in 1994. In 2016, the overall national coverage for MMR vaccine among children aged 19—35 months was 91.1%. However, MMR vaccine coverage levels continue to vary by state, with MMR coverage levels of <90% observed in 2016 in several states and local areas. At the county or lower levels, vaccine coverage rates may vary considerably. Pockets of unvaccinated people can exist in states with high vaccination coverage, underscoring considerable measles susceptibility at some local levels.

    For more information about 2016 childhood vaccination coverage, see a CDC MMWR.

    Q: Where do cases of measles that are brought into the United States come from?

    A: Travelers can bring measles into the United States from any country where the disease still occurs or where outbreaks are occurring including Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific. Worldwide, the 19 cases of measles per 1 million persons are reported each year; about 89,780 die. In recent years, many measles cases came into the United States from common U.S. travel destinations, such as England, France, Germany, India. During 2014, many measles cases came from the Philippines and Vietnam.

    Q: Why have there been more measles cases in the United States in recent years?

    A: In 2008, 2011, 2013, 2014, and 2015, states reported more measles cases compared with previous post-elimination years. CDC experts attribute this to:
  • more measles cases than usual in some countries to which Americans often travel (such as England, France, Germany, India, the Philippines and Vietnam), and
  • therefore more measles cases coming into the US, and/or
  • more spreading of measles in U.S. communities with pockets of unvaccinated people.


  • For details about the increase in cases by year, see Measles Outbreaks.
    Signos y síntomas
    Los síntomas del sarampión aparecen, por lo general, unos 7 a 14 días después de que la persona se infecta.

    El sarampión generalmente comienza con los siguientes síntomas:

  • fiebre alta,
  • tos,
  • moqueo (rinitis aguda o romadizo), y
  • ojos enrojecidos y llorosos (conjuntivitis)..


  • Dos o tres días después de que comienzan los síntomas, pueden aparecer puntitos blancos (manchas de Koplik) dentro de la boca.

    Tres a cinco días después de que comienzan los síntomas, se produce un sarpullido. Generalmente, este empieza como puntos rojos y planos en la cara de la persona en la parte donde comienza el cabello y se extiende hacia el cuello, el tronco, los brazos, las piernas y los pies. Sobre los puntos rojos y planos pueden aparecer unos bultos pequeños. Los puntos pueden unirse a medida que se extienden desde la cabeza hacia el resto del cuerpo. Cuando aparece el sarpullido, la fiebre puede aumentar a más de 104 grados Fahrenheit.

    Después de unos días, la fiebre disminuye y el sarpullido desaparece.

    Transmisión del sarampión
    El sarampión es un virus altamente contagioso que vive en las mucosidades de la nariz y la garganta de una persona infectada, y que puede propagarse a los demás a través de la tos y los estornudos.

    Además, el virus del sarampión puede vivir por hasta dos horas en una superficie o en el aire donde una persona infectada haya tosido o estornudado. Si otras personas respiran el aire contaminado o tocan la superficie infectada y luego se tocan los ojos, la nariz o la boca, pueden contraer la infección. El sarampión es tan contagioso que si alguien tiene la enfermedad, el 90 % de las personas cercanas a ella y que no tengan inmunidad también se infectarán.

    Las personas infectadas pueden transmitir el sarampión a los demás desde cuatro días antes de que aparezca el sarpullido hasta cuatro días después de su manifestación.

    El sarampión es una enfermedad de los seres humanos; ninguna otra especie animal transmite el virus del sarampión.

    Preguntas frecuentes acerca del sarampión en los Estados Unidos
    P: He estado expuesto a alguien que tiene sarampión. ¿Qué debo hacer?

    R: Llame a su médico de inmediato y dígale que estuvo expuesto a alguien que tiene sarampión. El médico podrá:
  • determinar si usted es inmune al sarampión con base en su registro de vacunación, edad o pruebas de laboratorio, y
  • hacer arreglos especiales para examinarlo, si fuera necesario, sin que se pongan en riesgo otros pacientes ni el personal de oficinas médicas.


  • Si usted no es inmune al sarampión, la vacuna contra el sarampión, las paperas y la rubéola (MMR) o un medicamento llamado inmunoglobulina pueden ayudar a reducir su riesgo de presentar sarampión. Su médico puede ayudar aconsejándolo y hacerle seguimiento para detectar señales y síntomas del sarampión.

    Si no recibe la vacuna MMR ni la inmunoglobulina, debería mantenerse alejado de los entornos donde haya personas vulnerables (tales como escuelas, hospitales o guarderías) hasta que su médico diga que está bien que regrese. Esto ayudará a garantizar que no lo transmita a otras personas.

    P: ¿Estoy protegido contra el sarampión?

    R: Los CDC consideran que usted está protegido contra el sarampión si tiene documentación por escrito (registros) que demuestre al menos una de las siguientes situaciones:
  • usted recibió dos dosis de la vacuna que contiene el antígeno del sarampión, y usted es…
  • un niño de edad escolar (de kínder a 12.o grado),
  • un adulto que va a estar en un entorno que presenta un alto riesgo para la transmisión del sarampión, incluidos los estudiantes en instituciones de educación posterior a la escuela secundaria superior, el personal de atención médica y los viajeros internacionales.
  • usted recibió una dosis de la vacuna que contiene el antígeno del sarampión, y usted es…
  • un niño de edad prescolar,
  • un adulto que no va a estar en un entorno de alto riesgo de transmisión del sarampión.
  • Un laboratorio confirmó que usted tenía sarampión en algún momento de su vida.
  • Un laboratorio confirmó que usted es inmune al sarampión.
  • Usted nació antes de 1957.


  • P: ¿Qué debería hacer si no estoy seguro de si soy o no inmune al sarampión?

    R: Si no está seguro de si es o no inmune al sarampión, ante todo debería tratar de encontrar su registro de vacunación o documentación de inmunidad contra esta enfermedad. Si no tiene documentación escrita de inmunidad contra el sarampión, debería recibir la vacuna contra el sarampión, las paperas y la rubéola (MMR). Otra opción es que un médico le haga una prueba de sangre para determinar si es o no inmune. Pero esta opción probablemente sea más costosa y necesitará dos visitas al médico. No le haría daño recibir otra dosis de la vacuna MMR si usted ya fuera inmune al sarampión (o a las paperas o la rubéola).

    P: Creo que tengo sarampión. ¿Qué debo hacer?

    R: Llame a su médico de inmediato y cuéntele acerca de los síntomas que está teniendo. El médico podrá:
  • determinar si usted es inmune al sarampión con base en sus registros de vacunación o si tuvo esta enfermedad en el pasado, y
  • hacer arreglos especiales para examinarlo, si fuera necesario, sin que se pongan en riesgo otros pacientes ni el personal de oficinas médicas.


  • P: Mi médico o alguien del departamento de salud me dijo que tengo sarampión. ¿Qué debo hacer?

    R: Si tiene sarampión, debería quedarse en casa por cuatro días después de que le aparezca el sarpullido. Quedarse en casa es una manera importante de evitar contagiar el sarampión a otras personas. Hable con su médico acerca de cuándo es seguro que regrese a otros lugares.

    Usted también debería hacer lo siguiente: Cubrirse la boca y la nariz con un pañuelo desechable cuando tosa o estornude y luego botar el pañuelo a la basura. Si no tiene un pañuelo desechable, tosa o estornude en la parte superior de la manga de su camisa, no en sus manos.
  • Lávese las manos frecuentemente con agua y jabón.
  • Evite compartir bebidas o utensilios para comer.
  • Desinfecte frecuentemente las superficies que se tocan, como los juguetes, manijas de las puertas, mesas, superficies de la cocina.
  • Llame a su médico si está preocupado acerca de sus síntomas.


  • P: ¿Qué tan eficaz es la vacuna contra el sarampión?

    R: La vacuna contra el sarampión es muy eficaz. Una dosis tiene una eficacia de casi 93 % para prevenir el sarampión si hay exposición al virus. Dos dosis tienen casi un 97 % de eficacia.

    P: ¿Podría contraer el sarampión de todos modos si he recibido todas las vacunas?

    R: Muy pocas personas, —unas 3 de cada 100—, de las que reciben dos dosis de la vacuna contra el sarampión, de todos modos contraerán la enfermedad si se exponen al virus. Los expertos todavía no están seguros del porqué. Podría ser que sus sistemas inmunitarios no respondieron a la vacuna tan bien como deberían. Pero la buena noticia es que las personas que reciben todas las vacunas y contraen el sarampión, tienen muchas más probabilidades de tener una enfermedad leve. Y estas personas que han recibido todas las vacunas también tienen menos probabilidades de contagiarles la enfermedad a otras, incluidas las personas que no pueden vacunarse porque son muy jóvenes o tienen el sistema inmunitario debilitado.

    P: ¿Necesitaré alguna vez una dosis de refuerzo?

    R: No. Los CDC consideran que las personas que recibieron dos dosis de la vacuna contra el sarampión en la niñez de acuerdo con el calendario de vacunación estadounidense están protegidas de por vida y nunca necesitarán una dosis de refuerzo.

    Los adultos necesitan por lo menos una dosis de la vacuna contra el sarampión, a menos que tengan evidencia de su inmunidad. Los adultos que vayan a estar en un entorno que presente un alto riesgo de transmisión de sarampión deben asegurarse de haber recibido dos dosis con un intervalo de al menos 28 días. Estos adultos incluyen los estudiantes en instituciones de educación posterior a la escuela secundaria superior, el personal de atención médica y los viajeros internacionales.

    Si no está seguro de si fue vacunado o no, hable con su médico. Más información acerca de quién necesita la vacuna contra el sarampión (en inglés).

    P: ¿Qué tan común era el sarampión en los Estados Unidos antes de que estuviera disponible la vacuna?

    R: Antes de que comenzara el programa de vacunación contra el sarampión en 1963, alrededor de 3 a 4 millones de personas contraían esta enfermedad cada año en los Estados Unidos. De estas, 400 a 500 morían, 48 000 eran hospitalizadas y 4000 presentaban encefalitis (inflamación del cerebro) a causa del sarampión.

    P: ¿Cuáles son los niveles de cobertura de la vacuna en los Estados Unidos?

    R: A nivel nacional, las tasas de personas vacunadas contra el sarampión han estado muy estables desde que comenzó el programa Vacunas para Niños (en inglés) (VFC) en 1994. En el 2016, la cobertura nacional general de la vacuna contra el sarampión, las paperas y la rubéola, o MMR, entre los niños de 19 a 35 meses de edad fue del 91.1 %. Sin embargo, los niveles de cobertura de esta vacuna siguen variando por estado, con niveles menores del 90 % observados en el 2016 en varias áreas estatales y locales. A niveles del condado o más reducidos, las tasas de cobertura de la vacuna pueden variar considerablemente. Pueden existir grupos de personas sin vacunarse en estados con alta cobertura de vacunación, lo cual destaca vulnerabilidad considerable al sarampión en algunos niveles locales.

    Para obtener más información acerca de la cobertura de vacunación infantil del 2016, consulte una edición del informe MMWR de los CDC (en inglés).

    P: ¿De dónde provienen los casos de sarampión que llegan a los Estados Unidos?

    R: Los viajeros pueden traer el sarampión a los Estados Unidos de cualquier país en donde esta enfermedad todavía ocurre o en donde estén ocurriendo brotes, incluidos los de Europa, África, Asia y el Pacífico. En todo el mundo, se notifican 19 casos de sarampión por cada 1 millón de personas cada año; aproximadamente 89 780 personas mueren por la enfermedad. En años recientes, muchos casos de sarampión llegaron a los Estados Unidos de lugares de destino comunes de los viajeros de este país, como son Inglaterra, Francia, Alemania y la India. Durante el 2014, muchos casos de sarampión llegaron de las Filipinas y Vietnam.

    P: ¿Por qué ha habido más casos de sarampión en los Estados Unidos en años recientes?

    R: En el 2008, 2011, 2013, 2014 y el 2015, los estados reportaron más casos de sarampión en comparación con los años siguientes a su eliminación. Expertos de los CDC atribuyen esto a lo siguiente:
  • más casos de sarampión que lo usual en algunos países a los que viajan con frecuencia personas de los Estados Unidos (como son Inglaterra, Francia, Alemania, la India, las Filipinas y Vietnam), y por lo tanto más casos de sarampión que llegan a los EE. UU., o
  • más contagio del sarampión en comunidades estadounidenses con grupos de personas sin vacunar.


  • Para obtener detalles acerca del aumento en los casos por año, consulte la página Casos y brotes de sarampión.